Wednesday, February 01, 2006

Colleges Fight FCC's New Online Wiretapping Rules

A group of colleges, libraries, and technology companies has asked a federal court to overturn a ruling, issued by the Federal Communications Commission, that facilitates Internet wiretapping. The 71-page brief, filed by organizations such as Sun Microsystems, Pulver.com, the American Association of Community Colleges, the Association of American Universities, and the American Library Association, has been sent to the US Court of Appeals arguing that the FCC has overstepped its bounds.

The ruling these groups want overturned could require ISPs and colleges to rewire their networks so that federal investigators can more easily track individuals' Web browsing and e-mail use. College and library officials argued that the rewiring would prove prohibitively expensive, and that it would inevitably lead to violations of their network users' privacy. (Sources: CNET News & Wired Campus)

1 comment:

esm said...

Oh yeah. This technology is not new. Cisco even has an RFC out for "lawful intercept". See http://www.rfc-editor.org/cgi-bin/rfcdoctype.pl?loc=RFC&letsgo=3924&type=ftp&file_format=txt

The RFC has various requirements. One of which is two different parties could be tapping the same third party conversation, but the two parties performing the wiretap wouldn't know the other was there.

I guess if you ask me if I'm for intercepts of Internet communications of individuals or organizations who chant "Death to America", then yeah, I'm for it.